On comfort zones

Image Cr/Jane – Habits for wellbeing 

There’s a time or moment when we just want to be who we are, do what we are used to, be with people we are familiar with, and so on. These are some of the dimensions of what’s called the comfort zone. I do not feel comfortable in any zone out of my comfort zone! But I recently learned that the space outside the comfort zone is called the growth zone and this comes from the quote:

“There is no growth in the comfort zone, and there is no comfort in the growth zone”

If you are constantly in your comfort zone, then perhaps you are not really maximizing your potential and paving way for growth. Going out of your comfort zone means challenging yourself to do better, to be better. Last semester, I took some intense classes and fell down several times along the way. Each time I got up, motivated to reach the finish line even on my knees. I talked to and became friends with folks I barely knew and still know nothing about save their first name.

Comfort Zone
Image Cr/ The Worry Free Life

Putting yourself in uncomfortable situations opens the way for growth. Your brain will not be stimulated if you are used to do the same thing over and over again, but becomes stronger and more active the moment you do something different or challenge yourself.

Used to sitting in the back of the room? Sit in the front or middle section.

Used to sit in the front or middle section? Sit in the back!

Shy? Talk about yourself to a new person.

Talkative? Listen more!

Math major? Take a painting class!

Art major? Take a math class.

If you ever feel uncomfortable, remember that that’s because you are in the growth zone where comfort is a luxury! Make the most of your talents and abilities, or rather discover them, by doing a different thing occasionally. #GrowthMindset

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Change: Does it matter who I am? Part 1

It has been a struggle the past few months (shucks!) to update my blog. It’s like I took a vacation from blogging, but a meaningful vacation as I spent most of my time surfing… surfing on the internet and reading other people’s blogs and articles. During my vacation, I had the perfect vantage to learn more about myself. I do not know about you, but I value self-knowledge. I came across a wonderful text on a blog written by my professor and I am glad I did. I will be writing a series of reflective posts on the matter of identity and how that ties with creating a positive (and/or negative) change in one’s life, family, community, town, province, country, continent, world, universe, and beyond. This is not an easy matter, therefore I kindly ask for your opinions as I progress through this series. Does it matter who I am to create or promote change?

Here goes the story:

His name was Fleming, and he was a poor Scottish farmer. One day, while trying to make a living for his family, he heard a cry for help coming from a nearby bog. He dropped his tools and ran to the bog.  There, mired to his waist in black muck, was a terrified boy, screaming and struggling to free himself.  Farmer Fleming saved the lad from what could have been a slow and terrifying death.

The next day, a fancy carriage pulled up to the Scotsman’s sparse surroundings.   An elegantly dressed nobleman stepped out and introduced himself as the  father of the boy Farmer Fleming had saved.  “I want to repay you,” said the  nobleman. “You saved my son’s life.” “No, I can’t accept payment for what I did,” the Scottish farmer replied, waving off the offer. At that moment, the farmer’s own son came to the door of the family hovel.

“Is that your son?” the nobleman asked. “Yes,” the farmer replied proudly. “I’ll make you a deal. Let me provide him with the level of education my son will enjoy. If the lad is anything like his father, he’ll no doubt grow to be a man we both will be proud of.”  And that he did.

Farmer Fleming’s son attended the very best schools and in time, he graduated from St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School in London, and went on to become known throughout the world as the noted Sir Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of Penicillin.

Years afterward, the same nobleman’s son  who was saved from the bog was stricken with pneumonia.

What saved his life this time?
Penicillin.

The name of the nobleman?
Lord Randolph Churchill.

His son’s name?
Sir Winston Churchill.